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Falaflame's Beginner Guide - How To Start Off!

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A normal conversation between me and a newbie always end up like this.

Newbie: How did you get that outfit?
Me: I bought it off of another player.
Newbie: How much was it?
Me: (insert some figure in mils)
Newbie: That's way too much! I only have 1k and I'm not very strong.
Me: ...

I get this. EVERY. SINGLE. TIME. I meet a newbie. So rather than repeat myself a few dozen more times, I'm just going to go ahead and outline the details here. If you found a newbie that's struggling to make dough, link them here.

Falaflame's Beginner's Guide to Mabinogi: Mastering Your Talent
Written by Falaflame. References are used by the Mabinogi Wiki of Mabinogi World. http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/

Chapter 1: The Basics

Mabinogi is a brutally difficult game to maintain a budget on. Depending on what server you may be on, price ranges on player shops will appear nigh impossible for you. You may have about 1k gold on you, and whatever you may want may be around 5 mil. That looks impossible to get... but let me assure you... it's actually not.

I have some outfits that may be priced over 5 mil. Sometimes over 10m. I didn't give in and shell out real life cash on NX just to get these either. I didn't burn away my money on gachapons. I didn't burn away my money on reforges to sell to other players. I got these outfits the hard way.

When I first started out, I was in the same shoes as most newbies are. I only did like 900 damage on a smash crit. I only had about 25k gold on me at the maximum. It felt awful. And, at the time, I only had access to some of the lower-end shadow missions because my total level was so low. But now, you can choose your shadow mission difficulty based on your talent level. I like this system a lot better than when it was based on total level, because it gives you incentive to focus on a specific talent.

If you don't know what a talent level does, it's basically a group of skills in a certain set. If you rebirthed/created your character, and have your talent set at a certain talent, you get double-training points for the skills listed in said talent. I won't list them all here, because there's way too much to go over, but if you want to know what talent lists the skills you want to train, you can go here:
http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Talent

But as I said, it becomes A LOT easier to train skills when you have the talent set to that certain skillset. If you want to train magic, you could set your talent to Mage. If you want to train Range, you could set your talent to Archer. You get the idea. And the higher you train your skills, the higher your talent level will be. Because most newbies who start off, inherantly, start off at a low talent level (everyone begins as Fledgling, which is a Lv1 Talent), they can only access Basic and Int difficulty shadow missions early-on, which may be why you aren't raking in much gold. This is why you want to work on your talent and try to get it as high as you can, so you can be able to build and maintain your own budget by going to high-level shadow missions. BUT, this also requires you to know what you are doing, and be strong enough to take out these enemies, too! Hard-level Shadow Missions are NO SLOUCH. They will wreck your life if you don't dispose of the enemies fast enough! Part of the incentive to ranking your talent level, is to get stronger and be able to help your own cause!

Chapter 2: Talent Choices

So as you begin the arduous journey to try to do something for yourself, you're probably wondering what talent you should begin with. You'll probably want to be a blazing mage who ignites every enemy with a giant meatball from space. You'll probably want to shoot a gigantic nuke from your bow. Or you could probably want to be the next Vash the Stampede and become a gunslinger perhaps. That all sounds cool and all. But your first talent should definitely be...
 

Bronze_Close_Combat_Icon.png
Close Combat! Ranking your Warrior Talent should be first and foremost for all upcoming newbies! There's multiple reasons why you will want to start off with this as your very first talent to rank, but I'll outline some of the most important reasons why you will want to master Warrior first before anything else you'll want to become.

  • You won't be entirely helpless when thrusted into a close and personal fight. I've seen way too many newbies make the mistake of ranking Range, Alchemy, Magic, etc because that's what they want to be, but neglect all of their close combat abilities. My question is... what's going to happen when you miss a magnum shot? What's going to happen if the enemy gets up in your face before you get a charge of Firebolt in? What's going to happen if you don't get a timely chained cylinder on your Water Cannon when the enemy is right in your face? What's going to happen if you have 5 of the enemies right in your face in the heat of a multi-aggro situation? You're going to have to resort to close combat eventually!
  • Almost every single skill that is listed in Close Combat can used with every skillset on other talents. In other words, you'll make the most out of your combat abilities if you have this talent mastered!
  • This talent gives a boatload of HP and Strength. HP is always welcome for beginners, because in a game like this, taking hits is /crucial/ at the beginning steps. And strength increases the amount of damage you do with your attacks. BUT, that's not the only reason why it's a benefit to master this talent. If you want to become a Mage, Fighter, or Archer, and you already have this talent mastered, you have another option you can explore once you master those resepective classes. Since Mage damage is based off of Intelligence, Fighter damage is based off of Will, and Archer damage is based off of Dexterity, this opens up another talent skillset you could potentially use with devastating effects: Gunslinger, Ninja, and Puppeteer. And since Strength is factored in for ALL THREE TALENTS on damage (Str/Int for Gunners, Str/Will for Ninja, Str/Dex for Puppets), having this class mastered maximizes your combat potential!
  • Warrior is by far the easiest and fastest talent to master. None of the other talents come even close.

The lowest Talent you can have is Fledgling, as I may have said before. The highest talent you can get to is Grandmaster (Lv16 Talent). However, you can only be grandmaster of one talent, so other than that, the highest you can get to is Master (Lv15 Talent). But I will stress this to you. You do not HAVE to become a grandmaster of Warrior! You can if you really want to maximize your close combat damage, lance damage, gun damage, shuriken damage, and puppet damage, but if you want to become a mage, fighter, or archer, there's really no reason to become a grandmaster of warrior. You can become a grandmaster of those respective talents instead. Warrior is mainly used as a stepping stone for newbies, and as such, you don't absolutely have to become a grandmaster of it. However, it is very highly recommended to get to at least Master.

Chapter 3: Skill Preferences

Alright, now for the biggest and meatiest part of this guide.

So now that you have your Talent chosen, you're probably wondering, "Where do I begin"? Most newbies make the mistake of advancing every skill up whenever they can be ranked. Hell, I've seen some newbies advance things like magic bolts up along with their talent skills. My suggestion is to stay within the talent you chose. Don't bother ranking anything outside of your talent, because it's a major waste of AP (which is a number of points used to be able to advance skills to the next rank). And in a game like this, AP gets used VERY QUICKLY. Even if you start with a 500 AP Potion, that doesn't mean you can just use it willy-nilly. It's best to rank your Warrior Talent skills, and ONLY those skills.

So, to answer your question of "where to begin", I have 2 skills that should be at the top of your list. These 2 skills should be prioritized over EVERYTHING ELSE.

Smash.pngWindmill.png

Smash and Windmill. These are the 2 skills that you will be using A LOT in most talent classes. Even Mages will want to give a good whack with their Wand if the enemy is too close. But the reason why you will want to be ranking these skills is different from each other.

As for Smash,

  • Smash has one of the highest damage multipliers in the game early on, and depending on what weapon you may be using, it may be bar none the highest. You're going to be dealing with Multi-Aggro A LOT in this game, so you're going to be using this skill very very often. It's better to deal with 2 aggroing enemies with Full HP than deal with 2 aggroing enemies with full HP AND 1 additional aggroing enemy that's damaged. The less enemies you have on the field, the better.
  • Smash is also used for knockback purposes too, which helps when trying to combo enemies. It's also one of the easier skills to train, too.
  • Smash also has a neat effect that has a chance to occur that either bleeds the enemy for Damage Overtime (if you used a sword), stuns an enemy from using magic or alchemy (if you used a blunt weapon), or decreases their defense and protection (if you used an axe). This definitely comes in handy in solo runs.

As for Windmill,

  • Windmill is your only Area of Effect attack you'll get access for for a VERY LONG TIME, so it's imperative you get this skill ranked up first and foremost.
  • It also has the ability to reset the enemy's AI.
  • Like Smash, knocks enemies back, which again opens the door to combo possibilities.
  • You will also get critical hits with this attack no matter what the enemy's protection stat is, so it is a very useful offensive AND defensive skill.


It is important to get both of these skills from Rank F to Rank 1 first and foremost. Smash is easy to get there, but you probably won't enjoy getting Windmill there at all. Windmill is your first brick wall as far as training skills goes, because it is a very grindy skill that requires you to be aware of your Combat Power (as in, a lot of your targets must appear as "Strong", "Awful", or "Boss" when you view the enemies using the ALT key). But don't let that discourage you!

You can train Smash just about anywhere. But by far the best enemies you can train them on is Foxes and Gray Town Rats. You can find foxes literally ANYWHERE, and Gray Town Rats are in damn near every dungeon you can do at your level. A good place to train Windmill... Honestly, there isn't very many good places to train Windmill. I will say this though. The Shadow Mission, "Their Method", located in Tara, WILL be your best friend. You're going to be there a lot, so I hope you'll get used to fighting Zombies a lot until you get your training done.

But once you get past the grindy part of ranking the Windmill, you WILL reap the benefits in the long run.

Critical_Hit.pngShield_Mastery.pngLight_Armor_Mastery.png

Critical Hit, Shield Mastery, Light Armor Mastery.

These are the skills you should be ranking ALONGSIDE the two top priority skills in Smash and Windmill.

  • Critical Hits are essential to train up if you want to dish out the big damage against enemies and finish them faster. It gets REALLY grindy in the later ranks, which is why it's generally suggested to train them ALONGSIDE other skills.
  • Shield Mastery and Light Armor Mastery isn't so much grindy. In fact both are relatively easy to train, and you can get them to r1 in a flash if you focus on them.


The reason why you'll want to rank these up is so your survivability becomes suitable to holding your own in shadow missions, and especially dealing with multi-aggro. You're going to want to be using an armor when heading to battle, and for beginners, you're going to always want to be carrying a shield with you. 99.9% of the time, you're going to be using a shield along with a weapon. Though which shield you'll be using depends what race you are.

  • For Giants, you'll be getting the Vales shield.
  • For Humans and Elves, it's the Kite Shield, OR, if you can find a Beholder's Shield from 35k-50k.

However, since both are relatively pricey, you also have the option of completing Generation 1 all the way until the "The Land of Eternity, Tir Na Nog" quest and get your Adventurer's Targe Shield there. (as well, if you feel reluctant on buying light armor, you can get yours there too) But eventually you'll want to get the aformentioned shields I mentioned.

  • As well, Shield Mastery is home to by far and away the best Master Title for beginners for a very long time (Master of Shields) so even after you get to r1 Shield Mastery, continue to work on Shield Mastery until you get the Master Title for it. Master of Shields has +10 defense and +10 protection, making you a walking wall of invulnerability, which definitely helps when soloing content.


Light Armor Mastery and Shield Mastery helps a lot. I can't stress how much the damage reduction from both skills help a lot. It definitely helps you solo a lot more content.

Notice I listed Light Armor Mastery instead of Heavy Armor Mastery. It's mainly because, while I heavily recommend Heavy Armor for everyone (in a lot of cases WAY more than Light Armor), they aren't easily acquired by any means for beginners. You'll have to have a boatload of gold to be able to get one, and it's especially frustrating to find one for Elves, because they can either only buy a heavy armor from another player, or be super patient to get one (Royal Knight Armor) with a boatload of adventurer seals. So it's generally better just to get Light Armor instead. You can buy one for 16k from Nerys in Dunbarton for Humans/Elves and 22k from Taunes in Vales for Giants. They're not cheap, but they're not outrageously priced like Heavy Armors tend to be. Though if you DO have access to Heavy Armor already (you can find out if you have one by checking here: http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Category:Heavy_Armor ) feel free to replace Light Armor Mastery above with Heavy Armor Mastery instead.

The best place to train all 3 of these skills (4 if you want to train Heavy Armor Mastery) is definitely Barri Dungeon (Normal). You will find Goblins, Goblin Archers, AND Imps here. Goblins will fulfill the melee damage part, Goblin Archers will fulfill the Ranged Attack damage part, and Imps will fulfill the magic damage part. Any of the 3 can critical you, too, but if you're fishing for crits, I suggest letting regular Goblins do it, as getting critted by archers and Imps aren't fun.

Defense.pngCounterattack.pngAssault_Slash.pngSword_Mastery.pngBash.png

Defense, Counter Attack, Assault Slash, Sword Mastery, and Bash.

These are the next set of skills to work on right after completing Smash and Windmill. If you're still working on Critical Hit, Light Armor Mastery, and Shield Mastery, work on them alongside these skills too.

  • Defense is important for much of the same reasons as both Armor Masteries and Shield Mastery. Training this skill will help reduce the amount of damage you take from enemies, even if you actually aren't using the skill, because of the base defense and HP gains you get from advancing the skill from Rank F to 1. You will be taking negligable damage a lot of the time when using Defense, unless you don't have any armor or shield on for whatever reason. Again, it helps when trying to solo content. So work on this when you can.
  • Counter Attack definitely helps, because not only do you not take damage at all, you use your enemy's damage rates (as well as your own) against it. Early on, your enemy will be doing some serious damage to you because your defense isn't up to par yet. So this will help a lot early-game. You will often be using this alongside Defense and Windmill because both of these skills have cooldown timers. It's not fun being caught when your defensive skills are all on cooldown timers, but usually, one of the 3 skills aren't on cooldown, so you should be fine. Having all 3 defensive skills I mentioned at r1 will help a lot when soloing content. You can also get Dex from advancing this skill, so if you plan on being an Archer, this skill will most likely be a next-to-top priority for you.
  • Assault Slash is a very good skill, because it opens the door for very many combo opportunities later on. It knocks the opponent away from you, or on its back in front of you. This also buys you time for what you want to do. This becomes a very important skill later on when you decide to go with other skillsets, because you can decide to switch to another weapon and launch a chaincast firebolt at the enemy if you so wish to, or start a chain with your FIghter skills. But for right now, this is the skill that ends your combo, so make sure this skill does as much damage as it can. One thing I will warn you about though. If you assault slash an enemy, and knock it on its back right in front of you, DO NOT ATTACK IT IMMEDIATELY AT ALL. You're looking at a nasty surprise attack if you do.
  • Sword Mastery increases the amount of damage you do to your enemies with your sword of choice, as well as your balance with said weapon. I could very easily put all 3 weapon masteries on here, but I feel Sword Mastery is the most important, mainly because your dex isn't so hot, especially when starting out, so your balance will be absolute garbage. And heaven forbid if you decide to upgrade Heavy Armor Mastery. Also, some of the best weapons you can have access to have REALLY low balance, either by base stats or after upgrades. If you can have 50-55% balance on your character stat screen with said weapon, though, you should be just fine. But any lower and you may want to consider using a weapon with higher balance, at least until you become strong enough where balance doesn't matter too much. The main draw of Sword Mastery is not only to do higher damage with your weapons (which is 99% of the time going to be Broad Swords anyway for a while) but to mitigate the really meagerly low balance your character WILL have for a while.
  • Bash is one of the newest entries to the skillset, and now one of the newest entries to this list. What Bash does is puts the enemy into, pretty much, a stunlock effect, especially in higher ranks. It's kinda tricky to use at first, but once you get used to using it, you'll be wanting to use it every opportunity to get. If gone on for long enough, it can outdamage Smash especially in damage per second, so if you're looking for other high-end damage options, this one is the one to go to. This skill only works when you have a "Close Combat" type of weapon, however. How you can figure that out will be easy: If you have a sword (that isn't a wooden sword or rapier), a blunt weapon, or an axe weapon, you can use this skill.

Four of these skills are relatively easy to train, very little grinding involved, so there shouldn't really be much of an issue when training them. You can train Counter Attack, Assault Slash, and Defense virtually anywhere, but Sword Mastery, you'll want to head into the bear fields in Dunbarton, as Sword Mastery does require you to be aware of your Combat Power, as I previously explained in the Windmill section. As for Bash, it does take relatively longer than the other skills, but the payoff is well worth it. However, you will most likely want enemy mobs with either higher amounts of HP or a large group of mobs, so bear fields or Shadow Cast City, the judgment is up to you on where you want to go to train Bash.

Combat_Mastery.png

Combat Mastery.

You can feel free to finally start working on this after you've got all the other skills I previously mentioned up from Rank F to 1. The reason why I suggested working on this a lot later on and not sooner, is because it drastically increases your Combat Power when you get it to higher ranks. And it really bites to have to work on Windmill when your target enemies are substantially stronger, and aren't so much in a pack. But that aside, it is important to get Combat Mastery to r1 once you got all the other previously mentioned skills out of the way.

Combat Mastery increases your HP by a truckload, gives you massive amounts of Strength, and increases your base max damage, critical rates, and balance upon each rank. This is an all-around boosting skill. Not only will you be tanking more hits than usual, but you'll also be dealing a lot more damage consistently. So advancing this from Rank F to Rank 1 is essential.

It's not too hard of a skill to train up, so thankfully, there's that. It's basically the same as the Sword Mastery training, just go to the bear fields in Dunbarton, and fight the stronger enemies there, as it does require you to be aware of your Combat Power as well.

Humans:
Final_Hit.pngCharge.pngAxe_Mastery.pngBlunt_Mastery.pngEvasion.pngBerserk.pngDoppelganger.pngDual_Wield_Mastery.pngRage_Impact.png

Elves:
Charge.pngAxe_Mastery.pngBlunt_Mastery.pngEvasion.pngDoppelganger.pngRage_Impact.png

Giants:
Charge.pngAxe_Mastery.pngBlunt_Mastery.pngEvasion.pngBerserk.pngDoppelganger.pngTaunt.pngWind_Guard.pngStomp.pngThrowing_Attack.pngDual_Wield_Mastery.pngRage_Impact.png

Final Hit, Charge, Axe Mastery, Blunt Mastery, Evasion, Berserk, Doppelganger, Taunt, Wind Guard, Stomp, Throwing Attack, Dual Wield Mastery, Rage Impact

These skills all can be helpful in some ways, and most of them carve a niche in combat, but they should all be ranked last in priority.

  • Axe Mastery can help with its massive critical increase and armor piercing increases, and Blunt Mastery helps with damage later on, as Blunts are generally good all-around weapons for higher leveled players (especially Maces and Warhammers), but your dex will often be too low to take advantage of either of them. The training is roughly the same as Sword Mastery and Combat Mastery, so again, head to the bear fields in Dunbarton to train these.
  • Dual Wield Mastery can definitely help in the same vein as Axe Mastery would, as it gives you extra additional max damage when dual-wielding swords (humans) or blunts (giants). And while that is nice, it does require you to have two weapons equipped at once, so it's your judgment whether or not you want to go with that. If you do train this, you might as well train this alongside Final Hit. It's not a difficult skill to train, just head into bear fields and/or Shadow Cast City and you can get it ranked relatively quickly. Keep in mind Elves can not dual-wield, so they can't get this skill.
  • Rage Impact is a relatively useful support skill. It will never do much in terms of damage, but it will stun the enemies long enough for you to escape from them and give you some breathing room. (or obliterate them with Smash/Bash, whichever works!) But while it is a useful support skill, training it is a downright nightmare. It's one of the grindiest skills in the game, worse than even Windmill! It's not mandatory to train this all the way to r1, but at least it is a nice skill to have off-hand. Just remember you can only use this skill if you have a sword (that's not a wooden sword or rapier), blunt, or an axe, so pretty much close combat weapons. There is no best way to train this, except maybe raccoons in Dugald Aisle or Foxes in Tir Chonail, or barrier spikes in Provocation Basic.
  • Charge gives you some strength in the later ranks, and it is an out against Archers should you struggle against those. It also lets you get in a quick attack when necessary. You can get this skill by completing a rafting quest in Courcle. You can only use this skill with a shield, which is why I have this skill a little lower on the priorities. That, and you won't want to rank this skill past Rank 5, because the training is ridiculous. You can complete this skill's training much easier in Martial Arts Competition, and you need to be a high-end player to be able to do those. So most of the time, its going to be a grindfest getting this skill from 5 to 1. Most of the training involves arrows, so heading to Barri Dungeon (again) will help the training.
  • Evasion allows you to dodge magic bolts, most basic alchemy attacks, and arrows. But since Charge does a much better job against arrows, It's only real use is against magic and alchemy, unless Charge is on cooldown. You can only train Evasion on specific types of attacks, so Barri Dungeon (Normal) will help a lot for a while until you start needing Alchemy attacks. In which case, you'll want to go to the Shadow Mission "Dorren's Request" (Basic) for a while in Tailteann. Note that you do not need to complete the mission, just fight enemies there. Also, Evasion is capped at r6, and doesn't generally give a lot of Talent EXP, so it is low on the priority list as far as training skills go.


Final Hit, Berserk, and Doppelganger aren't really super needed at any given point, and is only there just to pad your damage stats and help get your Warrior Talent up a lot more quicker. (in Final Hit's case, not so much Berserk and Doppelganger)

  • Final Hit gives a boatload of Talent EXP and Strength, so if you're going to be working on these set of late-ranking skills, you should be working on this one first. You can get this skill by completing the Final Hit quest located here: http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Final_Hit#Obtaining_the_Skill
    The concept of this skill is simple. Dual-wield your Broad Swords and go gung-ho on a group of enemies until they are dead. Make sure to be careful not to aggro multiple enemies, make sure to concentrate on one enemy until its dead and not spread your damage against a group of enemies, and especially make sure not to attack an enemy with Counter Attack loaded as it WILL delay the timer on the skill. And speaking of massive cooldown, this skill is frustrating to rank because of that cooldown. If you're a patient person like me, it won't be so much of an problem, but for others, it becomes a peeve. So make sure you get as much of your training as you possibly can before the skill ends. And if the cooldown issues aren't enough, you need to be aware of your CP to get your training done, just like windmill, combat mastery, weapon masteries, etc. The Tara Shadow Mission, "Shadow Cast City", will be your best friend, as there will be five enemies of varying CP levels depending on what kind of Bone enemies they are.
  • Berserk gives no Talent EXP and is only good for padding your Strength stats. You can get this skill by getting Apprentice Slayer hybrid talent. You'd have to work on Lances to get this skill, which is why I'm ranking this as a last priority to work on. It has absolutely no practical use in battle. The concept is there, basically sacrifice all of your survivability for inability of being knocked back and much higher damage output. It sounds cool in theory, but in practicality, it's far from it. There's absolutely no reason to drop ALL of your defense and protection even if it means having extra strength and not being stunned. I'd only suggest advancing this if you are desperate for more Strength. But if you do want to work on it, I suggest going to Shadow Cast City to train it, as, again, it is a skill that requires you to be aware of your CP, and you need multiple mobs of certain levels to rank the skill.
     
  • Doppelganger is probably the most useful out of these 3 skills. You can get this skill by getting Apprentice Vagabond hybrid talent. You'd have to work on Adventurer talent to get this skill, which is why I'm ranking this as a last priority to work on. It has a relatively high damage multiplier due to it being a 3-5 hit combo, can never be blocked, and bypasses Counter Attack, as well as stops an enemy's attack from hitting you. As well, it can be considered an attack from a range. However, the drawback with this skill is, you need to kill 5 enemies before being able to use this skill, which can be a drag when trying to train it. I suggest going to the bear fields in Dunbarton to get your training for this skill done. It is a fairly useful skill though, so you can feel free to train and use it after you get Master Warrior.

Lastly, Giant's skills. Taunt, Wind Guard, Stomp, and Throwing Attack. I've never used a Giant, so I have no experience or useful advice with any of these skills. But from what I have heard from other high-end pure Giant mains, they are all filler skills. They aren't needed in any way, shape, form, or order. Heck, some of them are entirely useless and outclassed by other skills, too. So don't fret on having to train them. I also have no idea what's a good way to train them, either, so someone else will have to inform me on that either in private or on a reply to this here, so I'll edit them in. I have heard that Throwing Attack has gotten buffed significantly, so it is worth using, but I still have no way of guiding you on how to train that. Your best bet is to ask a fellow Giant player themselves the best way to go about it.

Chapter 4: Magic Numbers

So you're getting pretty far in training your skills, so what's the best way to gauge how much further you have to go to a certain talent rank? What's the best way to gauge your progress?

There's only 2 ranks to shoot for, in my honest opinion. Expert (Lv11 Talent) and Master.
You can easily tell you're an Expert talent simply by just looking at your talent Icon and see that it has gold outlines.

An example being this: 
Gold_Close_Combat_Icon.png

If you see this, you can already access Hard Mode Shadow Missions, which is where you can finally get the biggest bang of your EXP and Gold with no restrictions whatsoever. You can get WAY more EXP and Gold from Elite Missions, but good luck finding Elite Passes for those. >.>

As much as it may be tempting to stop at Expert Talent, I honestly suggest going all the way to Master Talent. That way, you can access lord missions, AND, you can be able to equip Demonic weapons. Demonic Weapons tend to be the cream of the crop as far as stats are concerned, and some are considered the absolute best weapons you can get, coming unmatched to other weapons you can commonly see being sold in shops. But I wouldn't worry too much about those just yet, as they are generally very pricy to buy off of other players, and very pricy to maintain. (Very high repair bills too!) But I'll go more into that later. I'll tell you more of what you need to know about now: Your magic numbers.

Magic numbers is a term I kind of made up myself, really. It's basically the ranks of your skills that are needed to be at a certain Talent rank. Since we're working on Close Combat first and foremost, I'll lay out what you need. You need 926,000 Talent EXP to be at Expert, and 2,046,000 to be at Master. If you are confused on where you are at, consult this table located here: http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Talent#Talent_Levels

I'll be listing the rank of skills needed to be at Expert and Master. If I didn't list any skills, just assume they are at rF.

Expert Warrior:

Humans:
Windmill: r1
Smash: r1
Sword Mastery: r1
Defense: r1

Elves:
Windmill: r1
Smash: r1

Giants:
Windmill: r1
Smash: r1
Assault Slash: r1
Defense: r1
Counter: r1

Master Warrior:

Humans:
r1 Smash
r1 Windmill
r1 Counter
r1 Sword Mastery
r1 Assault Slash
r1 Defense
r1 Light Armor Mastery
r1 Shield Mastery
r1 Combat Mastery
r1 Critical Hit
r1 Final Hit

Elves:
r1 Smash
r1 Windmill
r1 Counter
r1 Sword Mastery
r1 Assault Slash
r1 Defense
r1 Light Armor Mastery
r1 Shield Mastery
r1 Combat Mastery
r1 Critical Hit
rE Charge

Giants:
r1 Smash
r1 Windmill
r1 Counter
r1 Sword Mastery
r1 Assault Slash
r1 Defense
r1 Light Armor Mastery
r1 Shield Mastery
r1 Combat Mastery
r1 Critical Hit
r1 Blunt Mastery
r1 Axe Mastery
r5 Charge
rE Evasion

Those are your magic numbers. Those are your minimum ranks to get to Expert and Master talent ranks.

Chapter 5: Equipment

Equipment is a large factor in how well you fight. And I'm not talking about reforges and enchants either, I'm talking about just clean base stats each weapon has, and what type it is. Since your dex at this point in time isn't so hot, I'll hook you up with a sword that you'll be using a lot.

Broadsword.png

Broadsword. This thing will carry you through most of your low-level times. It won't be outclassed by anything until you manage a decent dex and decent budget to get something better. It has decent crit, very high max attack, and although it does have low balance, your sword mastery and combat mastery will be more than enough to keep your character balance at around 55+. I suggest getting 2 of these. Not only because you might need a spare one, but because you'll be using this to rank Final Hit eventually. By far the best part about this sword is, it's one of the cheapest weapons you can find both repair-wise and base price. You can upgrade this in a variety of different ways, but there is one upgrade path I highly suggest taking.

Broadsword Upgrades:
1. Ranald's Broad Sword Enhancement (Upgrade at Ranald in Tir)
2. Tempering 2 (Upgrade at Ferghus in Tir)
3. Tempering 3 (Upgrade at Ferghus in Tir)
4. Nerys' Broad Sword Modification (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)
5. Nerys' Broad Sword Modification (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)

Kite_Shield.pngBeholder%27s_Shield.pngTarge_Shield.pngVales_Shield.png

Kite Shield, Beholder's Shield, Adventurer's Targe Shield, or Vales Shield. You can get the Kite Shield by buying it from Nerys for 60,000 gold, which is a pretty hefty price for a beginner. You could get it from another player for far cheaper (or they could just give it to you, i mean it's just a flipping kite shield >.> ), or you could get them from random drops from Int/Adv Shadow Mission enemies. If you can find a Beholder's Shield for about 50k off another player, that'd be great. If you are a Giant, Vales Shield is pretty much your best option. Failing all of that, you could just do Generation 1 and get your shield there. If you do get Adventurer's Targe Shield, you can't upgrade it, but if you get the Kite Shield, Vales, or Beholder's instead, there's one path you should consider.

Beholder's Shield Upgrades:
1. Beholder's Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)
2. Beholder's Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)
3. Beholder's Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)

Kite Shield Upgrades:
1. Kite Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)
2. Kite Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Nerys in Dunbarton)

Vales Shield Upgrades:
1. Vales Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Taunes in Vales)
2. Vales Shield Special Upgrade 1 (Upgrade at Taunes in Vales)

Linen_Cuirass_(M).pngLinen_Cuirass_(F).pngPirta_Leather_Armor.pngVito_Crux_Armor.pngVito_Crux_Armor_for_the_Giants.png

Linen Cuirass, Pirta Leather Armor, and Adventurer's Crux Armor. You can find the Cuirass for 16k by buying it from Nerys, or 15k if you buy it from Elen in Bangor. If you're a Giant, your only option is Pirta Leather Armor for 22k by buying it from Taunes in Vales. Failing all of this, you can do your Generation 1 quests to get the Adventurer's Crux Armor. This will allow you to take a lot more hits than usual, as the damage reduction will come in handy. You can't upgrade the Adventurer's Crux Armor, but you can upgrade the other armors. Keep in mind, armor upgrades are VERY pricey.

Armor Upgrades:
1. Surface Enhancement 2 (Upgrade at Nicca in Port Qilla)
2. Surface Enhancement 3 (Upgrade at Nicca in Port Qilla)
3. Surface Enhancement 3 (Upgrade at Nicca in Port Qilla)
4. Nicca's Light Armor Upgrade (Upgrade at Nicca in Port Qilla)

Tail_Cap.png

Tail Cap. This one is completely optional. But if you can find one with the "Stiff" enchant on it, by all means go and get it. These are everywhere, and they are hard to miss. These don't have any upgrades, so don't worry about upgrading them.

For legwear and handwear, there aren't any recommendations. If you can find it for cheap, and it's effective, go ahead and get it.

Chapter 6: Generation 2 And/Or 3

You have your gear (or at least most of your gear), you ranked up a lot of your most important skills. Now it's time to get something that'll be a huge clutch help for you right now and years down the road: Getting your Transformation.

Now, whether you want Dark Knight or Paladin is entirely down to preference. I personally prefer Paladin because I don't get my health drained if I let my trans go for too long, plus my stat gains are more consistent (while DKs can have a higher ceiling but have erratic rolls at times).

But regardless, contrary to popular belief, you do not HAVE to complete Generation 1 to complete Generation 2 and 3. You can just skip Generation 1 completely by just getting to total level 100. You can easily do that in 2-5 days by leveling up a bunch and rebirthing each day, so don't sweat it!

If you want just Paladin, you'll only be completing Generation 2. If you want Dark Knight, you'll have to complete Generation 2 AND 3. If you're an Elf or Giant, you'll only be doing Generation 2 because you don't have any choice in what you'll become. You'll find all the details about generation 2 and 3 here:


http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Generation_2
http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Generation_3:_Dark_Knight


Chapter 7: Other Helpful Tips

  • Do NOT repair at Ferghus, Elen, and Colm, ever. While they have the lowest repair bills, they have the lowest repair rates for weapons and armor, and will hurt you more than help you. However, do not repair at Edern and Granat just yet, because their repair bills will overwhelm your budget. Your best bet is to just repair at Nerys (Dunbarton), Nicca (Port Qilla), Meles (Filia), Taunes (Vales), Andras (Tailteann), and Osla (Emain Macha) until you can sustain a solid budget.
  • You will get Beginner Shadow Crystals while you are under total 1000. MAKE USE OF THEM. You'll be forced to buy shadow crystals once you're past total 1000.
  • On the subject of Shadow Crystals, once you've worked up enough money (at least 500k gold), and you're strong enough, buy 5 Potent Shadow Crystals, head to Tailteann's "Defeat Fomor Commander II" on Hard (one of Tail's easiest SMs), and complete it 5 times, each with the potent shadow crystal. You most likely paid 300k for those 5 shadow crystals, less if you bought them during when gachapons are handing them out like candy, and you earned 438k from the missions, not including the gold you picked up from the enemies, or the tidal wave cylinders you may have found at the endchest you might sell for 200k. Do the math. :D
  • If you're strong enough, I suggest getting Saga I done. All of the episodes. If you complete Saga I entirely on your character, you will get yourself a Battle Pegasus, which is a pet you can summon for a large inventory and an entry AoE attack. AoE pets are hard to find without spending a boatload of money on NX, and you are able to get 8 of them at most, so maximize the amount you can get. :D
  • On the subject of Pets, before you even try to get Saga I done, you should get your beginner Horse and Eagle pets. While they don't have any inventory space, you have mount pets that can fly you somewhere, and hitch a ride for some faster than you would by foot. They can also act as an alternate target when you enter shadow missions, do Generation Quests, or do Saga I. You can get them by completing your beginner quests.
    http://wiki.mabinogiworld.com/view/Beginner_Quests_(Human_Uladh)#Former_Beginner_Quests
    These quests in specific.


That's about all I can help with. Hopefully this guide helps someone. Everything I have outlined here has helped others, including people who still play today.

Edited by Falaflame

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I think I outlined as much as I could. If there's anything I missed, or something I should bring up, or something I should correct, please let me know.

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I think I've made the final touches. I think I'm satisfied with what I have so far.

If there's anything I missed, something I should bring up, or something I should correct, please let me know.

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I think it's argueable of close combat being the greatest base class. True, it holds many of the essentials to many classes, but the game is easily passable by ranking up shield mastery alongside complementary skills to firebolt. Heavy armor mastery might be needed, but you can always just grab some potions then. The shield prevents you from being killed and the firebolt will kill most things in 1-3 hits.

I think what you really need to address is that the player needs to empower themselves and to answer the original question, how to obtain more money. When a newbie asks me the same question, I tell them to become strong(alongside advice on their chosen class). Although close combat is one of the easiest ways, and renovation should also help with this, it simply isn't a great way to deal with mobs at the higher end game.

One of the greatest flaws in becoming strong is the fact that it is hard for newbies to obtain levels, and therefore ap early on in the game. This restricts their growth and puts a bottleneck on their growth. My remedy for this is to try and get a newbie into a guild quickly where there are people that can help them with their chosen talent and also help them level so that they become strong enough to tackle activities that earn moderate gold.

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It's true that having a guild definitely helps. This guide is written almost entirely from a soloing standpoint, or from a standpoint of a player who doesn't have much in terms of outside help.

Close Combat isn't the only way to get stronger and be able to help newbies get to where they want to go, but it is by far the easiest, most efficient, and least hair-pulling way to do it. And it's the fastest way to be able to get to Hard Mode shadow missions.

Edited by Falaflame

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This is a fantastic guide.

If I had this 6 years or so ago, I wouldn't have been built with variety in mind, and be a 2.5k jack*** of all trades, and actually be more useful with my 33 seconds in bullethell mode.

Spread this, PLEASE, for this is a fantastic guide.

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It's a kind of ok guide, though I wouldn't recommend Smash. Rank F is all you need as a newbie (it has a almost non-existent stamina cost at rF and still does a respectable 200/300% damage), and because it's not CP dependent, you can r1 it anytime without issue. Otherwise you end up chugging a lot of stamina potions which you either have to farm/make or buy, sitting around resting with EM active wasting time, and running the risk of introducing yourself to that private little hell know as potion poisoning which requires a long time wasted sitting in the Zardine hotsprings to get rid of once it starts reducing your stats.

The ideal set-up IMO, is to focus on 1hd + Guard Cylinder (tab 1) with some form of instrument (tab 2).

This gives you melee (can be done with a wand as well to add magic into the mix as well) and the benefits of a small shield, + you can use alchemy for ranged attacking/pulling/ultility (Water Cannon (high damage), Wind Burst (another knockback option if your latency is too bad for countering with Windmill pre-rank 5 or firebolt takes too long to cast), and Summon Golem (mostly used as a distraction or 2nd pet) are all you really need, but freezing blast (Crowd control), flame burst (cone shaped AoE), and sand blast (Crowd Control) are all relatively easy to acquire and give extra niceties) which for a lot of the early game is solid damage even at rF, and a quick swap for a instrument for Lullaby and buffing Enduring/Battle as needed.

I'd avoid ranking most combat skills above F, and instead focus on passives like the armor/shield mastery and enough play instrument to get Lullaby (mixed enemy rooms or multi-aggro enemies)/enduring melody (the god-song that should always be up between battles or against trivial enemies)/battlefield overture (for tougher enemies)...even at rF those songs work great (low CP, Low AP costs, big benefits), rest (low CP, bonus HP) relatively easy to skill up except for two books that require dungeons, but you're strong enough to take both of them at rF combat skills, and it just gets easier and as you get more AP to spare and can start mixing/matching skills to suit the challenge.

 

And abuse the crap out of the beginner ability to reset your AP at will (once you have about 300 AP saved up (~160 is enough for most beginner skills), you have enough AP to take most skills in the game from F to r1, and at 600+ you can R1 any skill, but you will lose a little AP getting skills from novice to rank F, so make sure to do any dailies that give AP coupons/potions to help offset that.

And once you get about 700 AP, stop resetting your levels on rebirth, and just switch your talent to whatever skill set you want to build up, and do that till you've at least r1'd all Combat power dependent skills and acquired any master titles for those skills you're interested in. Non-CP dependant skills are optional, but you run of CP skills or it's really easy to r1, then go ahead.

Every day try to rank 1 at least 1 skill (Even intermediate spells/abilities can be rank 1'd within about 30 minutes as long as you have enough AP to purchase the ranks and where to find enemies of the appropriate Combat Power to suit your needs. Iria is a promised land of Combat Power gradients with most skills being able to be effortlessly rank 1'd just using enemies around Port Qilla, the flower mark, human mark, and Dragonbone Tomb. Passives like Armor mastery and shield mastery are extremely grindy so just work them up slowly while you train other skills, as before they're extremely cheap on AP and CP so you can afford to keep them max ranked at all times) , then reset your AP and spend your points into whatever build you use for quest/dungeon running. You want to focus mostly on skills that depend on Combat Power first, since those are MUCH easier to skill up when you can flush your Combat Power to low levels by dropping most of your skills and allows you to train them up on easier to kill enemies. Earning AP is easy.....but the stronger your character gets the harder CP dependent skills become to train, so it's best to train them NOW when they're easy and then simply re-buy them later once you have the AP to spare. You could spend Adventurer seals on this, but IMO, those are better spent on production professions post r9 (especially r8 weaving...seriously...%^$& that skill) or skipping the book requirement for cooking ranks 8-6, because the Cooking Dungeon is STUPID as %^&$.

Light Armor and shield mastery can be r1'd for less then 30 AP each and have a negligible amount of CP (you can leave both at r1 when doing your skilling phase without impacting which enemies you can train on), since they'll give you a HUGE amount of defense/protection and make skilling/questing a lot easier. 60 HP is a lot when enemies can only hit you for 1-2 damage a pop.

 

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Where has this been all my life, I feel like the most inproficient player in the universe been playing 2 years now level around 1.7k (might I add about 50 rebirths.. talk about wasted)  atm never reached a master talent only wise, im a seasoned warrior and generally run around with 5~25k haven't touched light armour and honestly haven't finished any generation quests apart from ... feel mega unacomplished right now :sigh: 

(Can I redeem myself?:sob:)

Also really good guide! If I could I would be advertising this everywhere next to duncan on ch3.

 

:byeb:

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It's a kind of ok guide, though I wouldn't recommend Smash. Rank F is all you need as a newbie (it has a almost non-existent stamina cost at rF and still does a respectable 200/300% damage), and because it's not CP dependent, you can r1 it anytime without issue. Otherwise you end up chugging a lot of stamina potions which you either have to farm/make or buy, sitting around resting with EM active wasting time, and running the risk of introducing yourself to that private little hell know as potion poisoning which requires a long time wasted sitting in the Zardine hotsprings to get rid of once it starts reducing your stats.

The ideal set-up IMO, is to focus on 1hd + Guard Cylinder (tab 1) with some form of instrument (tab 2).

This gives you melee (can be done with a wand as well to add magic into the mix as well) and the benefits of a small shield, + you can use alchemy for ranged attacking/pulling/ultility (Water Cannon (high damage), Wind Burst (another knockback option if your latency is too bad for countering with Windmill pre-rank 5 or firebolt takes too long to cast), and Summon Golem (mostly used as a distraction or 2nd pet) are all you really need, but freezing blast (Crowd control), flame burst (cone shaped AoE), and sand blast (Crowd Control) are all relatively easy to acquire and give extra niceties) which for a lot of the early game is solid damage even at rF, and a quick swap for a instrument for Lullaby and buffing Enduring/Battle as needed.

I'd avoid ranking most combat skills above F, and instead focus on passives like the armor/shield mastery and enough play instrument to get Lullaby (mixed enemy rooms or multi-aggro enemies)/enduring melody (the god-song that should always be up between battles or against trivial enemies)/battlefield overture (for tougher enemies)...even at rF those songs work great (low CP, Low AP costs, big benefits), rest (low CP, bonus HP) relatively easy to skill up except for two books that require dungeons, but you're strong enough to take both of them at rF combat skills, and it just gets easier and as you get more AP to spare and can start mixing/matching skills to suit the challenge.

 

And abuse the crap out of the beginner ability to reset your AP at will (once you have about 300 AP saved up (~160 is enough for most beginner skills), you have enough AP to take most skills in the game from F to r1, and at 600+ you can R1 any skill, but you will lose a little AP getting skills from novice to rank F, so make sure to do any dailies that give AP coupons/potions to help offset that.

And once you get about 700 AP, stop resetting your levels on rebirth, and just switch your talent to whatever skill set you want to build up, and do that till you've at least r1'd all Combat power dependent skills and acquired any master titles for those skills you're interested in. Non-CP dependant skills are optional, but you run of CP skills or it's really easy to r1, then go ahead.

Every day try to rank 1 at least 1 skill (Even intermediate spells/abilities can be rank 1'd within about 30 minutes as long as you have enough AP to purchase the ranks and where to find enemies of the appropriate Combat Power to suit your needs. Iria is a promised land of Combat Power gradients with most skills being able to be effortlessly rank 1'd just using enemies around Port Qilla, the flower mark, human mark, and Dragonbone Tomb. Passives like Armor mastery and shield mastery are extremely grindy so just work them up slowly while you train other skills, as before they're extremely cheap on AP and CP so you can afford to keep them max ranked at all times) , then reset your AP and spend your points into whatever build you use for quest/dungeon running. You want to focus mostly on skills that depend on Combat Power first, since those are MUCH easier to skill up when you can flush your Combat Power to low levels by dropping most of your skills and allows you to train them up on easier to kill enemies. Earning AP is easy.....but the stronger your character gets the harder CP dependent skills become to train, so it's best to train them NOW when they're easy and then simply re-buy them later once you have the AP to spare. You could spend Adventurer seals on this, but IMO, those are better spent on production professions post r9 (especially r8 weaving...seriously...%^$& that skill) or skipping the book requirement for cooking ranks 8-6, because the Cooking Dungeon is STUPID as %^&$.

Light Armor and shield mastery can be r1'd for less then 30 AP each and have a negligible amount of CP (you can leave both at r1 when doing your skilling phase without impacting which enemies you can train on), since they'll give you a HUGE amount of defense/protection and make skilling/questing a lot easier. 60 HP is a lot when enemies can only hit you for 1-2 damage a pop.

 

Urk... I don't wanna double post but I really want point out that this is a  beginners guide not "how I should work on my new alt"  thats all, what you've said is  reallysmart but if I just started would have no idea what you're on about... I mean I dont know the difference from a guard cylinder and a cylinder so I doubt a beginner would aswell unless im just that bad :lonely:

 

:byeb:

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Yup. Joining a decent guild helps a lot too. Although I'd usually advise staying away from the more popular guilds, as they are usually prone to general drama.

I really do need to re-write this guide eventually to incorporate the uses of Bash and Dual Wield Mastery, as well as Final Hit.

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noob question and when I've asked it no one has responded ever, could I rank windmill to r5 and just leave it or is r1 significantly better then r5 as in is it faster? and easier to use, im like 2k+ atm so ranking windmill is a huge pain in the butt....

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Windmill isn't as huge of a deal as it was before, but it's still a nice chunk of Will and Strength. It all really depends on how much effort you want to put into it. However, you should also be aware that if you do want to get Windmill to rank 1 at some point, then you should do it as soon as possible. The longer you wait, the higher your CP will be, and the harder it will be.

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Windmill also gives a large amount of talent exp as well, so it'll shoot you up in talent ranks very quickly. r1 also has increased WM radius, which helps a lot, especially when dealing with multi-aggro. So not only is it statistically beneficial, but beneficial in a lot of very common scenarios, too.

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This guide is Amazing, very good to learn.

 

I wish I had this when I was new <3

One little thing though, I think Rage Impact, Dual Wield Mastery  and specially specially Bash need to be added to this.

I have found Bash to be THE close combat Skill to use. Too useful to not be added to this wonderful guide <3

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i do need to toss Bash on this guide eventually. Probably put it up there along with Counter, Defense, and Assault Slash. I don't consider it important enough to outprioritize Windmill, but it is important enough to have another powerful option. (plus ranking 2 heinously awful grindfest skills at the same time is something I will never ask a newbie to do)

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Updated the thread to incorporate use of Bash, Dual Wield Mastery, and Rage Impact.

Didn't really overhaul the guide that much. Tbh, the Combat Renovations didn't really change much aside from a few new skills, only one of which I feel is good enough to use early on, and making certain skills viable again (Final Hit).

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Lastly, Giant's skills. Taunt, Wind Guard, Stomp, and Throwing Attack. I've never used a Giant, so I have no experience or useful advice with any of these skills. But from what I have heard from other high-end pure Giant mains, they are all filler skills. They aren't needed in any way, shape, form, or order. Heck, some of them are entirely useless and outclassed by other skills, too. So don't fret on having to train them. I also have no idea what's a good way to train them, either, so someone else will have to inform me on that either in private or on a reply to this here, so I'll edit them in. I have heard that Throwing Attack has gotten buffed significantly, so it is worth using, but I still have no way of guiding you on how to train that. Your best bet is to ask a fellow Giant player themselves the best way to go about it.

Alright, let me give another high-end giant main perspective on this.

Taunt: Effective especially at higher ranks, if you need to get aggro off a buddy, or bring the enemies to you. (Unless they're archers, then it just brings trouble.)

Training Taunt: Go into provocation and spam it. I'm serious. Those spikes have low CP, but there's a lot of them, so it can train taunt extremely easily.

Wind Guard: At a high rank, this skill can tank many attacks, including attacks that would trigger your Defense skill and make you susceptible to big damage intake.

Training Wind Guard: The middle room in Tara's Sulfur Spider mission where there are literally tons of those little spiders that attack really fast.

Training Wind Guard Part II: There's a requirement that makes you use melee attacks while using it. This is where Provocation comes into play. See video below.

Training Wind Guard Part III: There's another requirement that needs magic and archery attacks. Again, video below explains it all.

 

Stomp: I can somewhat agree with this, this skill is completely useless at low ranks, but it does give a lot of strength, including it's Master title. But, it can be useful for giving you a split second of air during a fight, because it stuns whatever it hits.

Training Stomp: Video below.

Mission: Tara's "Their Method".

Throwing Attack: I've seen high-end giants with Throwing attack, and even without Elemental reforges (fire, ice, lightning, etc) they can still hit up to 15,000 damage and higher. This is a skill that can be outclassed by a plethora of other skills, but in of itself, it's quite useful for one-on-one fights.

Training Throwing Attack: Again, the same way of training as stomp, just leave the finish rule as it is. This one is CP-dependant, so you'll have to hold the ALT key and see how strong the enemy is.

Edited by Darkfire16

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Hello, I am a beginner in  this game and i started following your guide. But I have some questions and i was wondering if you could help me...

when can one start mastering other classes then? After mastering close combat? If this is the case, shouldnt i reset all of my skill to reduce my CP and its easier to level up skills from another class (as in not close combat).

Thanks for the guide,

i am still trying to rank up windmill....... T.T

 

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Hello, I am a beginner in  this game and i started following your guide. But I have some questions and i was wondering if you could help me...

when can one start mastering other classes then? After mastering close combat? If this is the case, shouldnt i reset all of my skill to reduce my CP and its easier to level up skills from another class (as in not close combat).

Thanks for the guide,

i am still trying to rank up windmill....... T.T

 

Impressive, you catch on quick to the reset-snatch-and-grab tactic most veteran players on new characters do.

 

Yes, when you master close combat, and your below 1k level, talk to Duncan and reset all of your skills to get your CP back down to normal level. You should start training other classes when you feel comfortable with where your close combat is right now. Sure, a guide or a pro player can tell you when and how to do it, but when it comes down to it, it's all about preference.

 

P.S: Rank 1 Windmill, I totally feel your pain. If you get stuck on that like I did, just save up gold for a windmill potion to get past that rank. It's really annoying.

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It's actually not a bad idea to reset your skills back to F talking to duncan when you're under 1k. At the very least, if you struggle under other skillsets, you can always raise your combat skills with no training cost. (the only thing you'd be needing at this point is AP)

And Rank 1 Windmill... yeah, I feel ya. The training on r3 and r2 is especially brutal. As a new player, that skill will test your patience. But trust me, you will reap the rewards.

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